WHEN Do You Write?

When is the best time of day for writing?

I’ve added my own answers and polled some hope*writers for their answers as well.

The truth is, there is no best time to write.

Or, conversely,

EVERY time is a good time to write.

It doesn’t matter what you write or when, the fact that you are writing is the important part. I broke the day down into three categories: Morning, Afternoon, and Evening and listed the pros and cons for each time of the day. Let’s get into it.

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

MORNING

Pros: Let’s face it, you’re at your best. You’ve just come off a good night of sleep and your energy level is at the highest it will be all day. This is a great time to get going and start your day at the computer or with your notebook. Many people decide morning is the best time to write because they and their ideas are freshest. Many writers can think more clearly, get more done, and have fewer distractions.

Cons: Not everyone is a morning person. It can be hard to get up in the morning for something you technically don’t have to do. Some people have early morning responsibilities, such as getting kids off to school, making lunches, and commuting to work. Some folks can get up an hour early to work out or have a quiet time or write, but it’s not a possibility for everyone.

AFTERNOON

Pros: Some people may have more free time in the afternoon when kids are at school or in activities. Benefits of the afternoon include not being so tired or so rushed to get from point A to point B. Most people are already awake and well into their day by lunchtime and the afternoon can be a reprieve from morning or evening activities. If there’s a lull, it can be a great time to write. Sometimes the afternoon just works better.

Cons: On the flip side, some people are worn out by the afternoon and hit a slump. Ferrying kids to and from school and after-school activities can leave little time for creativity. It’s also a somewhat awkward time of day in between busy mornings and evenings. Unless one has a designated writing time for the afternoon, the creativity can get lost in the activity shuffle.

EVENING

Pros: Day is done and so are most of life’s responsibilities. After dinner and kids’ bedtime, there can be some glorious writing hours, especially for those who consider themselves “night owls.” Many people find it easier to think about themselves and their writing after they’ve had a full day of activity. Plus, the ideas have had all day to mull around your brain and take shape. Evenings can be the quietest time of day and more conducive to concentration and productivity.

Cons: Most people have been zapped by the end of their full day. Work, kiddos, and other responsibilities can wear on a writer, and it can take major self-control to sit down to write when all you want to do is hit the hay. Not to mention, you may have more evening activities to attend to and your day may not end until quite late.

Photo by Jessika Arraes on Pexels.com

So what’s the answer?

Write whenever works for you.

The most important thing about writing is consistency. Writers have to make time to write, and that means utilizing the “crack” space in between activities, or scheduling a “chunk” of time in which to be productive.

What works for you will depend on the kind of writer you are.

The most important thing is to write.

As for me, I find my best time is in the morning, though I do schedule some writing times in the evenings like my LIVE@5 WRITING STREAM on Tuesday nights. I find it best to write in “chunks” (though I do occasionally take advantage of the “crack” time) because I can concentrate on my subject and minimize distractions.

What about you? Do you write in “cracks” or “chunks?” What time of day do you write?

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